Water Cycle

Acid Mine Drainage Remediation

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In this video, an environmental technologist visits an abandoned coal mine in Kentucky to talk about how a remediation system (a series of settling ponds and treatment cells) is neutralizing the acid drainage from the mine and preventing damage to a creek downstream. He shows the path of the acid drainage as it flows down a hillside from the mine into a settling basin and on to treatment cells where limestone is used to raise the water's pH. At a higher pH, iron and other minerals drop out of solution, which means that these harmful precipitates stay in the settling basins rather than flowing into the creek.

This resource is part of the Water Solutions collection.

This video is available in both English and Spanish audio, along with corresponding closed captions.

Watershed | Episode 8: Spring-Fed

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The Switzer family has been ranching atop the Ogallala Aquifer in the Sandhills of Nebraska for generations. As their family grows, their water needs grow. See how they have adapted to balance family and land for a sustainable future.

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Water in the Sandhills | Platte Basin Education

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The water supply in the Sandhills depends on local precipitation, which is relatively low. Yet, there are several rivers, including the Niobrara, Dismal, and Loup Rivers that originate in the Sandhills, more than 2,000 shallow lakes, and over one million acres of wetlands in the areas between the dunes. Even during periods of drought, the Sandhills maintain reliable supplies of water.

Watershed | Episode 2: The Weight of Water

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When snow falls on Berthoud Summit in Colorado, people down the watershed benefit from the snowmelt that makes its way to their communities in the spring and summer months. But how much water is in snow? And how is it measured? Meet two snow scientists responsible for monitoring snowpack in the Rocky Mountains and gathering data used to predict water supplies in the affected river basins each season.

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Watershed: Part I (Middle School) | Saving Our Waters

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What is a watershed and what evidence can we find that water quality problems exist in our watershed? We’re connected to neighbors through water and what we do impacts others. Water moves downhill and downstream. Different subwatersheds have different challenges. There are indicators of expected threats to water quality such as steep slopes, low forest cover, and high road density. What are other indicators?

These Saving Our Waters Curriculum Connections were created by High School and Middle School teachers seeking to engage our next generation of stewards. The 12 Curriculum Connections naturally connect to the Next Generation Science Standards.

Watershed | Episode 6: Groundwater Rising

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Like the snows in the high country of Colorado, groundwater is critical to the health of watersheds everywhere. Travel to a remote region of western Nebraska where rainfall is rare but wetlands abound as a result of the aquifer rising up from beneath.

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Controlling Water Run-off

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This video shows how the environmentally friendly design of the Visitor Center at Bernheim Arboretum and Research Forest near Louisville, Kentucky helps to control non-point-source water pollution, conserve water, and prevent erosion by slowing down and collecting water run-off. The video examines the sources of non-point-source water pollution, the structure and function of a green roof, using a reservoir to collect water, and the structure and function of a French drain and a cistern.

Water Cycle | Science Trek

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This short video segment from IdahoPTV's Science Trek explains how the water cycle works, in moving water from the ocean to the clouds, around the earth and back to the ocean.

CAP Shortage Priorities

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A 1075 foot elevation is the trigger for a level one shortage.If that shortage is declared, then CAP would lose access to about 320,000 acre-feet or about 20% of what we deliver on annual basis. As Lake Mead continues to fall, if it continues to fall, at 1050 foot, the reduction increases to 400,000 acre-feet to Arizona. At 1025 foot, the reduction would be 480,000 acre-feet to Arizona.

Biodiverse Regions: Blood River

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Adapted from the Kentucky Life biodiversity series, this KET video offers information about the biodiversity of the Blood River area in Kentucky.

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