World History

Homo Sapiens Versus Neanderthals

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Explore the origins of modern humans. Fossil evidence from Middle East caves and elsewhere has revealed some competitive advantages modern humans, known as Homo sapiens, are believed to have held over the more archaic human species, Neanderthals. For example, during the time in which the two species may have coexisted, Homo sapiens lived on high ground, from which they could survey the landscape and plan their hunting expeditions. Some scientists have theorized that the success of this strategy may have contributed to the demise of the valley-dwelling Neanderthals, who became extinct about 30,000 years ago. Adapted from NOVA.

This video is available in both English and Spanish audio, along with corresponding closed captions.

Hajj: Part II | Religion & Ethics Newsweekly

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Over two million Muslims from around the world travel to Mecca each year for the Islamic pilgrimage known as Hajj. How does this experience change their lives? This video from Religion & Ethics Newsweekly follows American Muslim Abdul Alim Mubarak as he experiences Hajj for the first time.

March 14, 2019 | News Quiz

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This episode features stories about International Women's Day, the first lady's "Be Best" iniative, voter fraud in North Carolina, Sully the service dog, more Carnival celebrations, Jeff Koons and the world's oldest public art museum, the Geneva Motor Show, emerald ash borers, Bob Ross, and more. News Quiz is KET's weekly 15-minute current events program for students. The program consists of news segments, a current events quiz, opinion letters, and an Extra Credit report.

Answer this week's opinion question at the News Quiz website. You can also copy this week's quiz to use in Google Classroom.

October 11, 2018 | News Quiz

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This episode features stories about the Nobel Prize, Melania Trump's visit to Africa, the earthquake and tsunami in Indonesia, NASA's anniversary, a new outer space discovery, art in London, and more. News Quiz is KET's weekly 15-minute current events program for students. The program consists of news segments, a current events quiz, opinion letters, and an Extra Credit report.

Answer this week's opinion question at the News Quiz website. You can also copy this week's quiz to use in Google Classroom.

Note: PBS LearningMedia's download feature is not currently functioning properly. We are sorry for the inconvenience as PBS works to resolve this issue.

Cahokia’s Celestial Alignment | Native America: Cities of the Sky

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Cahokia was a Native American city that existed from about 1050-1350. The Mississippi mound civilization shared the same cosmological beliefs as the great ancient cities of Central and South America, and at its peak covered about six square miles and included over one hundred mounds. Those living in Cahokia held a fundamental understanding of the cosmos and aligning to it. But Cahokia’s city grid was 5 degrees precisely off the north-south axis, and did not align with the sun or moon’s movements. Why is this? Archaeologist Tim Pauketat explains the reason, revealing impressive rigor in city-planning.

Norway Races Britain to the South Pole | Teaching with Primary Sources

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This inquiry kit has Library of Congress sources about two European explorers. Roald Amundsen and Ernest Henry Shackleton made trips to find the South Pole.

Part 1: Auschwitz | Meeting Max: A Holocaust Survivor's Story

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Luke, a high school student, has become interested in learning about the Holocaust after watching historical black and white footage. He partners with Alabama Public Television to film an interview with Max Steinmetz, a Holocaust survivor, with hopes of going beyond the history books. Max tells a compelling story of being rounded up and sent to Auschwitz where he was separated from his parents and sister. He never saw them again. Luke grapples with his own emotions as he hears this first-person account of the extermination of Jews at Auschwitz. He comes to realize that old black and white footage of the Holocaust is a record of real people who suffered as Max suffered. He comes to realize the enormity of suffering caused by the Holocaust.

The Core Tenets of Hinduism

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Discover some of the core tenets of Hinduism as experienced in Varanasi, one of India’s holiest cities, in this video adapted from Sacred Journeys with Bruce Feiler. The Hindu religion is difficult to describe because it does not have a single founder, text, or set of beliefs. Rather, it is characterized by an overlapping set of practices, cultural values, and norms. The main purpose of human life is to get closer to God so that one’s soul can be released from a cycle of human suffering, death, and rebirth and achieve unity with the divine. This resource is part of the Sacred Journeys with Bruce Feiler Collection.

Forgiveness and Redemption | Les Misérables

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Explore the meaning of kindness, love, and forgiveness in this video excerpt from Les Misérables | MASTERPIECE. Based on the famous novel by Victor Hugo, the production tells the story of Jean Valjean, who emerges from 19 years in a forced-labor prison—where he was sent for stealing a loaf of bread for his hungry family. Angry and vengeful after his cruel treatment, he is suspicious and astonished when he encounters Monsieur Myriel, the Bishop of Digne, who offers him food, shelter, and the opportunity for redemption.

Find out more about MASTERPIECE on the series website.

The Dark Ages... How Dark Were They, Really? | Crash Course World History

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John Green teaches you about the so-called Dark Ages, which it turns out weren't as uniformly dark as you may have been led to believe. While Europe was indeed having some issues, many other parts of the world were thriving and relatively enlightened. John covers European Feudalism, the cultural blossoming of the Islamic world, and the scientific and artistic advances in China, all during these "Dark Ages." Along the way, John will raise questions about the validity of Europe's status as a continent, reveal the best and worst years of his life, and frankly state that science and religion were once able to coexist.

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