World History

March 21, 2019 | News Quiz

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This episode features stories about the college admission scam, grounded Boeing planes, President Trump's first veto, the crisis in Venezuela, the World Wide Web's anniversary, new New York City attractions, junior beekeepers, beluga whales, the super bloom in California, and more. News Quiz is KET's weekly 15-minute current events program for students. The program consists of news segments, a current events quiz, opinion letters, and an Extra Credit report.

Answer this week's opinion question at the News Quiz website. You can also copy this week's quiz to use in Google Classroom.

October 18, 2018 | News Quiz

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This episode features stories about internet access and young people in Cuba, Hurricane Michael, a space failure, Nikki Haley's resignation, Brett Kavanaugh's confirmation, a new power plant at Chernobyl, hair in Brazil, giant pumpkins, help for puffins, and more. News Quiz is KET's weekly 15-minute current events program for students. The program consists of news segments, a current events quiz, opinion letters, and an Extra Credit report.

Answer this week's opinion question at the News Quiz website. You can also copy this week's quiz to use in Google Classroom.

The Mayo Clinic: The Evolution of Modern Medicine

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The Mayo Clinic: Faith, Hope, and Science is a documentary from Ken Burns, Erik Ewers, and Christopher Loren Ewers. The film tells the story of William Worrall Mayo, an English immigrant who began practicing medicine with his sons Will and Charlie in Rochester, Minnesota in the late 1800s.

The Teotihuacan Fire Ceremony | Native America

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In this sacred story about the Aztec solar year, the gods give sacrifices to ring in a new cosmic era. To mark this moment of transition, Teotihuacanos conducted a New Fire Ceremony at the base of the sun pyramid. In the course of this ceremony, the gods put out all existing fires across the land, and the Fire Priest built a new fire. Runners carried this fire to all the temples and houses, meaning all fires in the land were lit from the same original fire at the sun pyramid. This ceremony reset the calendar cycle, renewing the world. The Aztec detail this story in one of their few surviving texts.

The New Fire Ceremony was a ritual held every 52 years in November upon the completion of a full cycle of the Aztec solar year (xiuhmopilli). The ceremony’s purpose was to renew the sun and bring another cycle. This was the single most important event on the Aztec religious calendar because if the ceremony was not successful, Aztec civilization would end.

 

Road to War and the Morning of the Attack | Pearl Harbor - Into the Arizona

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Before the attack on Pearl Harbor, life on Honolulu seems idyllic. US soldiers and sailors described life on the island as beautiful and calm. A former Japanese Imperial pilot tells a different story, of Japan waging war in the pacific, preparing to attack airbases and battleships.

The Hajj: Islamic Sacred Pilgrimage

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Explore the Hajj, the traditional pilgrimage to Mecca, through the experience of present-day American Muslims and learn about the origins of Islam in its birthplace of Medina in this media gallery from Sacred Journeys with Bruce Feiler. According to Muslim tradition, all of the world’s able-bodied believers must make the Hajj at least once in their lives. They strip themselves of worldly possessions and ask God’s forgiveness for their human failings. Pilgrims enter a sacred state of spiritual purity and wear plain garments. Then, inside the city’s Great Mosque, they walk in a circle seven times around the Ka’bah shrine. This resource is part of the Sacred Journeys with Bruce Feiler Collection.

How Radar Changed the Course of World War II | The Secret of Tuxedo Park

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Learn how technological innovations developed by MIT’s Radiation Laboratory, or “Rad Lab,” helped tip the balance of World War II to the Allied forces, in this video adapted from The Secret of Tuxedo Park: AMERICAN EXPERIENCE. Following the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, hundreds of scientists and engineers rushed to develop an automated radar device to detect and track an enemy aircraft in flight. Microwave radar systems greatly improved the shooting accuracy of defensive weapons and were used to neutralize the German army’s fearsome V-1 rocket bombs.

The Columbian Exchange | Crash Course World History

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John Green teaches you about the changes wrought by contact between the Old World and the New. John does this by exploring the totally awesome history book The Columbian Exchange by Alfred Crosby, Jr. After Columbus "discovered" the Americas, European conquerors, traders, and settlers brought all manner of changes to the formerly isolated continents. Disease and invasive plant and animal species remade the New World, usually in negative ways. While native people, plants, and animals were being displaced in the Americas, the rest of the world was benefitting from American imports, especially foods like maize, tomatoes, potatoes, pineapple, blueberries, sweet potatoes, and manioc. Was the Columbian Exchange a net positive? It's debatable. So debate. 

 

This resource contains footage of an individual taking "the Cinnamon Challenge" a previously viral internet food challenge that has been deemed unsafe by medical professionals. Please discourage students from mimicking this practice. 

The Atlantic Slave Trade | Crash Course World History

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John Green teaches you about one of the least funny subjects in history: slavery. John investigates when and where slavery originated, how it changed over the centuries, and how Europeans and colonists in the Americas arrived at the idea that people could own other people based on skin color.

Decolonization and Nationalism Triumphant | Crash Course World History

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John Green teaches you about the post-World War II breakup of most of the European empires. As you'll remember from previous installments of Crash Course, Europeans spent several centuries sailing around the world creating empires, despite the fact that most of the places they conquered were perfectly happy to carry on alone. After World War II, most of these empires collapsed. This is the story of those collapses. In most places, the end of empire was not orderly, and violence often ensued. While India was a (sort of) shining example of non-violent change, in places like The Congo, Egypt, Rwanda, Vietnam, Cambodia, and Laos, things didn't go smoothly at all. John brings you all this, plus pictures of Sea Monkeys. Sadly, they don't look anything like those awesome commercials in the comic books.

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