World History

Homo Sapiens Versus Neanderthals

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Explore the origins of modern humans. Fossil evidence from Middle East caves and elsewhere has revealed some competitive advantages modern humans, known as Homo sapiens, are believed to have held over the more archaic human species, Neanderthals. For example, during the time in which the two species may have coexisted, Homo sapiens lived on high ground, from which they could survey the landscape and plan their hunting expeditions. Some scientists have theorized that the success of this strategy may have contributed to the demise of the valley-dwelling Neanderthals, who became extinct about 30,000 years ago. Adapted from NOVA.

This video is available in both English and Spanish audio, along with corresponding closed captions.

Hajj: Part II | Religion & Ethics Newsweekly

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Over two million Muslims from around the world travel to Mecca each year for the Islamic pilgrimage known as Hajj. How does this experience change their lives? This video from Religion & Ethics Newsweekly follows American Muslim Abdul Alim Mubarak as he experiences Hajj for the first time.

March 28, 2019 | News Quiz

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This episode features stories about climate change protests, flooding in Nebraska, Cyclone Idai, Google's new cloud gaming service Stadia, Nowruz, Japan's preparations for the Olympics, elephants in the UK, the last Blockbuster store, volcanoes in Russia, Harry Potter, and more. News Quiz is KET's weekly 15-minute current events program for students. The program consists of news segments, a current events quiz, opinion letters, and an Extra Credit report.

Answer this week's opinion question at the News Quiz website. You can also copy this week's quiz to use in Google Classroom.

January 24, 2019 | News Quiz

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This episode features stories about the government shutdown, Brexit, the L.A. teacher's strike, a Hindu pilgrimage, rammed earth construction, the American Kennel Club Museum of the Dog, a new coffee museum in Vietnam, the aurora borealis, and more. News Quiz is KET's weekly 15-minute current events program for students. The program consists of news segments, a current events quiz, opinion letters, and an Extra Credit report.

Answer this week's opinion question at the News Quiz website. You can also copy this week's quiz to use in Google Classroom.

Poppy Northcutt, NASA Pioneer | Chasing the Moon

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Learn how Poppy Northcutt overcame sexism and a “boys’ club” atmosphere to become the first female engineer in NASA’s mission control in the 1960s—a situation she describes as a “complete peculiarity” at the time—in this video adapted from Chasing the Moon: AMERICAN EXPERIENCE. Northcutt, a feminist, endured repeated interview questions that focused on her appearance rather than her qualifications. However, she used the platform to demonstrate that women could work outside of stereotypical jobs.

Agriculture as the Foundation of Early Native Governmental Structures | Native America: Nature to Nations

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Learn how growing corn helped the Haudenosaunee and Maya develop their respective confederated governments. Students will examine how companion plant cultivation developed by the Haudenosaunee and Mayan tribes led to greater understandings of cooperative government.

Mapping the Korean Peninsula | Korea: The Never-Ending War

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In this lesson, students will explore the ways Korea was divided at the end of World War II and how that division separated families, disrupted lives, and laid the foundation for the Korean War. Students will answer scaffolding questions about the video segment. They will then complete a map activity locating regional features on a map, the 38th parallel, locate key cities and identify water bodies, land masses, and neighboring countries.  They will analyze the geo-politics of the region as key players, Soviet Union, China, and the United States vied for influence. 

Students will:

  • Understand how Korea was divided, North and South
  • Explain the challenges the United States faced establishing a sphere of influence in Asia
  • Describe the unintended challenges for the Korean people living in a divided country
  • Identify key topographic and political features on a map of Asia
  • Analyze the costs and benefits to the United States and the Korean people of placing American troops in Korea after World War II.

About the Author

Greg Timmons has been a social studies teacher for over 30 years. He has written lessons for several PBS productions, including The NewsHour; FRONTLINE; Black America Since MLK: And Still I Rise; and various Ken Burns productions, such as The War, Baseball, The Central Park Five, The Roosevelts, Jackie Robinson, and The Vietnam War. He is the winner of the 2007 American Educational Publishers Award. 

Wesleyan Female College | Georgia Stories

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In the early 1800s there were not many schools, and if you were a girl, there was even less of an opportunity for an education. Florence Fleming Corley at Kennesaw State College reports that while boys and girls were taught the same basic skills, girls quit school sooner to learn homemaking skills. It wasn't until the founding of Wesleyan College that women had an opportunity for higher education.

Fighting Prejudice and Bullying | FILMS BYKIDS

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Learn how a young girl who immigrated to New York City from Yemen dealt with Islamophobia in this video from FILMS BYKIDS: Poet against Prejudice. The video introduces students to 17-year-old filmmaker Faiza Almontaser, an anti-bullying activist. Faiza worked with a BYkids film mentor to tell the story of her experience as young Muslim in post-9/11 America.

Visit the FILMS BYKIDS website to learn more about the series. To see the full film and learn more about Faiza click here.

To learn more about Islam, visit the collection Promoting Understanding: Islam.

 

Plessy vs. Ferguson

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A mere thirty-five years after slavery ended, a sophisticated and strategic group of African Americans challenged the Jim Crow Separate Car Act in the state of Louisiana by placing a fair-skinned Creole black man named Homer Plessy on the “whites only” railcar. This video presents how the landmark Supreme Court case Plessy v. Ferguson helped legalize segregation and sent a message that the federal government favored states' rights in all matters of fairness and equality.

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