World History

Egypt’s Arab Spring | Women, War & Peace II

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Learn about the Egyptian Arab Spring and the women who put themselves on the line fighting for justice, reform and freedom in this video from Women, War & Peace II. Support materials include video, discussion questions, background essays, and teaching tips to help students understand the events and importance of the Arab Spring in Egypt.

For more resources from Women, War & Peace II, check out the Discussion Guide developed by Peace is Loud.

Last Men in Aleppo | Lesson Plan Clip 5: "The End of This Story"

Icon: 
Streaming icon

The clip begins at 1:18:56 with a shot of explosions at night. It ends at 1:22:26 with a slate explaining the fate of the White Helmet members featured in the film. We see burial preparations for a rescue worker who was killed. It is Khaled.

January 31, 2019 | News Quiz

Icon: 
Streaming icon

This episode features stories about the federal government reopening, the World Economic Forum, turmoil in Venezuela, the recent lunar eclipse, esports gaining popularity, new dog breeds added to Westminster, a Pakistani pencil artist, swimming with sharks, and more. News Quiz is KET's weekly 15-minute current events program for students. The program consists of news segments, a current events quiz, opinion letters, and an Extra Credit report.

Answer this week's opinion question at the News Quiz website. You can also copy this week's quiz to use in Google Classroom.

September 27, 2018 | News Quiz

Icon: 
Streaming icon

This episode features stories about limiting electronic device screen time, Hurricane Florence and the hurricane rating system, KET's anniversary, Mexico's independence day, Korean talks, space exploration, creative training techniques, happy goats, and more. News Quiz is KET's weekly 15-minute current events program for students. The program consists of news segments, a current events quiz, opinion letters, and an Extra Credit report.

Answer this week's opinion question at the News Quiz website. You can also copy this week's quiz to use in Google Classroom.

Michael Moore: English Civil War: Battle of Worcester 1651

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Filmmaker Michael Moore believed all his maternal ancestors were Irish immigrants, but he was surprised to learn of his Scottish ancestors who were sent to America in the 1650s as POWs of the English Civil War. 

The Battle of Worcester in 1651 was the last battle in the English Civil Wars, a series of conflicts that took place in the Kingdoms of England, Ireland and Scotland. Beginning around 1642, these wars were the result of differences over how the Kingdom should be governed, with the Royalists supporting the rule of absolute monarchy, and the Parliamentarians or Roundheads supporting a rule by Parliament. The Battle of Worcester marked the end of the Royalists’ attempts to regain power through warfare. This resulted in the exile of the monarch Charles II, while the Commonwealth of England, Scotland and Ireland were led by Oliver Cromwell. 

The final battle took place in Worcester, England when Scottish Royalists, supporting King Charles II, marched south to England to help regain the throne from the Roundheads. They anticipated gathering support for their cause along the way, but they were seen as invaders and were quickly defeated by Oliver Cromwell and his armies waiting for them at Worcester; over 3,000 men were killed and approximately 10,000 captured. 

The captured men were forced to march over 100 miles to London where many of them were sent to the New World and sold into forced servitude. The prisoners were sent on multiple ships abroad and sent to New England, the upper South and Barbados. Many of the men ended up in the sawmills and the ironworks in Massachusetts, New Hampshire and Maine, sold into indentured servitude for periods of up to seven years. Given the length of their servitude and their poverty few ever were able to return to Scotland.

Dunkirk and D-Day | ANTIQUES ROADSHOW

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Explore Dunkirk and D-Day, two historic battles of World War II, with this collection of artifacts featured in a video excerpt from ANTIQUES ROADSHOW. Remarkably, a British soldier experienced both battles. His legacy includes map and handwritten instructions for crossing the English Channel to rescue stranded British troops at Dunkirk, and a rare U.S. Legion of Merit award to a British serviceman for service during D-Day.

Hydrogen Bomb Debate | The Bomb

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Learn how America faced a critical choice after the Soviets got their own atomic bomb in this clip from The Bomb. The US had a monopoly on nuclear weapons but in 1949, the Soviets got the bomb too. In response, some urged a crash program to develop a hydrogen bomb, to stay ahead of the Soviets. Others said this was an opportunity to stop the insanity of building nuclear weapons. Facing a Soviet Union that seemed determined to expand, and political pressures to appear strong, Harry Truman chose to build the H-bomb, and so began the nuclear arms race.

Jerusalem: Sacred and Contentious

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Learn about Jerusalem and its significance in the Jewish, Christian, and Muslim faiths in this media gallery from Sacred Journeys with Bruce Feiler. Throughout history, pilgrims from these three major religions have traveled to Jerusalem. Jewish tradition states that all descendants of Israel should make a pilgrimage to see the temple compound three or more times a year. Christian pilgrims flock to the city where their Bible states that Jesus was crucified, buried, and resurrected. And Muslims visit Jerusalem to fulfill a commandment from the prophet Muhammad. This resource is part of the Sacred Journeys with Bruce Feiler Collection.

Taking Sides | Les Misérables

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Gain insights into the causes of political upheaval in France and the role that young people played in the Paris Uprising of 1832, in this video excerpt from Les Misérables| MASTERPIECE. Set in a tavern, the scene conveys the various viewpoints of the era, including those who supported the monarchy, those who favored Napoleon, and those who were determined to return to the earlier principles of the 1789 French Revolution, even if it meant outright rebellion once again.

Find out more about MASTERPIECE on the series website.

The Renaissance: Was it a Thing? | Crash Course World History

Icon: 
Streaming icon

John Green teaches you about the European Renaissance. European learning changed the world in the 15th and 16th century, but was it a cultural revolution, or an evolution? We'd argue that any cultural shift that occurs over a couple of hundred years isn't too overwhelming to the people who live through it. In retrospect though, the cultural bloom in Europe during this time was pretty impressive. In addition to investigating what caused the Renaissance and who benefitted from the changes that occurred, John will tell you just how the Ninja Turtles got mixed up in all this.

Pages