World History

Last Men in Aleppo | Lesson Plan Clip 3: "Ceasefire at the Playground"

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The clip begins at 52:30 with Khaled asking his daughter if she wants to go to the playground. It ends at 55:49 with Khaled in the car with his children. A rare outing for area children is disrupted when aircraft are spotted.

April 18, 2019 | News Quiz

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This episode features stories about black holes, ancient ice, the fire at Notre Dame, the bomb cyclone in the Midwest, Martin Luther King Jr.'s letter from jail, the Malham salt cave, a Greek shipwreck, a study about the intelligence of cats and more. News Quiz is KET's weekly 15-minute current events program for students. The program consists of news segments, a current events quiz, opinion letters, and an Extra Credit report.

Answer this week's opinion question at the News Quiz website. You can also copy this week's quiz to use in Google Classroom.

December 6, 2018 | News Quiz

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This episode features stories about the passing of President George H. W. Bush, NASA's Mars lander, General Motor's cutbacks, the International Children's Peace Prize, the Leaning Tower of Pisa, dolphin intelligence, the 2018 World Chess Championship, and more. News Quiz is KET's weekly 15-minute current events program for students. The program consists of news segments, a current events quiz, opinion letters, and an Extra Credit report.

Answer this week's opinion question at the News Quiz website. You can also copy this week's quiz to use in Google Classroom.

Is There Intelligent Life Beyond Earth? | It's Okay to Be Smart

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Now that we know planets are common in our galaxy, how can we tell if one holds life? Sure, it will take incredibly powerful telescopes and ambitious new space missions, but what are we looking for? Life on Earth has an expiration date. No matter what humans do, our aging sun will eventually be so hot that we can't survive. If we want to live on, it will have to be beyond Earth. The only question is, will it be us who live on, or just our radio broadcasts and dead satellites?

The Fall of the Berlin Wall | Teaching with Primary Sources

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This inquiry kit features Library of Congress sources relating to the fall of the Berlin Wall in November 1989.

Thinking Questions

  • Why was the Berlin Wall built?
  • How and why did it come down?
  • Why was the fall of the Berlin Wall so important?

Current Events in Ukraine: Unfolding a Political Crisis

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Use these six videos and accompanying Teacher’s Guides from PBS Newshour Extra to address the current political crisis in Ukraine. These news stories span from December 3, 2013, through March 10, 2014.

The current wave of protests in Ukraine began in late November 2013, after Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych, under pressure from Russia, rejected a deal that would have created closer ties with the European Union. Protests flared again in mid-February, spreading from the capital of Kiev to other regions and leading to violent clashes between police and demonstrators that resulted in the deaths of more than 80 people. The Ukrainian parliament responded by impeaching President Yanukovych on February 22, causing him to flee to Russia. Following Yanukovych's impeachment, which Russians and pro-Russian Ukrainians opposed, Russia sent troops to Ukraine’s Crimean peninsula, which is geographically and culturally close to Russia. As of March 7, a newly appointed government in Crimea has proposed a March 16 referendum that would allow residents of Crimea to vote on whether to secede from Ukraine and join Russia, or stay in Ukraine with greater autonomy.

The Teacher's Guides below provide facts and links on Ukraine's background, including the longstanding tension between its ties with Russia and links to Western Europe, as well as discussion questions and writing prompts addressing this tension and the United States and NATO's response to the developing crisis.

Discussion Questions:
Consider these news stories as informational "texts." If you view all five videos in a row, consider how news stories unfold over time. Does the spread of the crisis to the Crimea in February 2014 seem predictable or unpredictable given reporting from December and January? What do these news stories omit that would be useful for an in-depth understanding of these events?

Representing Inverse Variation Algebraically | Algebra 1: Module 11 - Topic 4

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In this program students learn about representing inverse variations algebraically, an example of a rational formula. Instructor: Cryshel Whitehead (The transcript of this program is available for download at the link below.)

Georgia’s African Heritage | Georgia Stories

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Just a short ferry boat ride away from the Georgia coast lies Hog Hammock, an African American community on Sapelo Island with cultural traditions that tie it to Africa. Slaves came to Georgia bringing nothing more than memories from their African homeland. Cornelia Bailey, a descendant of slaves who worked the plantations on Sapelo, imagines the terrible sadness her ancestors felt knowing they were so far away from home with no way to return.

America in World War I | Crash Course US History

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In which John Green teaches you about American involvement in World War I, which at the time was called the Great War. The United States stayed out of World War I at first, because Americans were in an isolationist mood in the early 20th century. That didn't last though, as the affronts piled up and drew the US into the war. You'll learn the war's effects on the home front, some of Woodrow Wilson's XIV Points, and just how the war ended up expanding the power of the government in Americans' lives.

Latin American Revolutions | Crash Course World History

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John Green talks about the many revolutions of Latin America in the 19th century. At the beginning of the 1800s, Latin America was firmly under the control of Spain and Portugal. The revolutionary zeal that had recently created the United States and had taken off Louis XVI's head in France arrived in South America, and a racially diverse group of people who felt more South American than European took over. John covers the soft revolution of Brazil, in which Prince Pedro boldly seized power from his father, but promised to give it back if King João ever returned to Brazil. He also covers the decidedly more violent revolutions in Mexico, Venezuela, and Argentina. Watch the video to see Simón Bolívar's dream of a United South America crushed, even as he manages to liberate a bunch of countries and get two currencies and about a thousand schools and parks named after him.

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