World War I

Wartime Propaganda | The Great War

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Discover how the Committee on Public Information (CPI), led by George Creel, launched a massive publicity campaign to support the United States’ entry into World War I, in this video adapted from The Great War: AMERICAN EXPERIENCE. Appointed by President Woodrow Wilson, Creel created innovative ways, including using the movies—the new mass media—and celebrity culture, to dispense pro-war propaganda to create enthusiasm for the war and dampen dissent. This resource is a part of the AMERICAN EXPERIENCE: The Great War Collection.

Have All the Men Gone Mad? | Black Jack Pershing: Love and War

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Pershing led American and French troops in the 47-day battle of the Meuse-Argonne. Germans used tactical advantages and machine gun nests to wreak havoc on ill-trained American troops amid cold, confusion, and mud. Ignoring calls for his replacement, Pershing stopped everything to reorganize and resupply. Allies took the Argonne forest. Germany was weakened but still inflicting heavy casualties.

 

Zionism and the Balfour Declaration

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This enhanced video resource for The Story of the Jews provides a look at the people and negotiations behind the Balfour Declaration and explains what was promised to Jews in this famous letter. The resource also explores Zionism and examines a text called "Auto-Emancipation," which argued for the necessity of a Jewish nation. The discussion questions and optional student activities ask students to summarize and analyze primary sources and historical events for context and meaning.

An Army from Scratch | Black Jack Pershing: Love and War

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In 1918, Germany’s all-out onslaught forced Pershing to mobilize all American assets despite any doubts about readiness. Pershing missed his son. The Doughboys’ first battle victory raised morale and US leverage. Pershing commanded African American regiments, but rather than integrate US forces, he had African American troops serve with French troops or carry out cargo or construction tasks.

Progressive Age

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The Progressive Era was a time of great economic growth and social change in the United States. It’s also a great topic for an essay on the Regents Exam. This video includes the rise of Teddy Roosevelt's "Bull Moose" party.

Soldier & Citizen: Suffrage

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This excerpt from the full length documentary Soldier & Citizen gives a brief historical overview of the woman suffrage movement. Experts include Dr. Carole Bucy, professor of history at Volunteer State Community College and Davidson County Historian; Dr. Lisa M. Budreau, senior curator of military history at the Tennessee State Museum; and Ronald R. Krebs, Ph.D., professor of political science, University of Minnesota.

Revolutions

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Revolutions are a great subject for the essay question on the Regents Exam. This video covers every major revolution, from pre-historic man to the present day.

Seth Meyers: The Battle of Passchendaele, World War I

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Talk show host Seth Meyers learns about his great-grandfather, Frederick Whetham, who was born in 1886 in England and immigrated to the United States as a young man. By 1916, he was a husband and father. At this time, World War I was raging in Europe and England was in peril, but America had not yet entered the fight. Frederick decided to join the fight, and headed north to join the Army of Canada, which was still part of the British Empire.  

World War I remains one of the bloodiest and most costly wars. And Frederick entered into some of the worst fighting of the war, participating in the Third Battle of Ypres, also known as the Battle of Passchendaele. 

Passchendaele was a small Belgian village. In the summer of 1917, the British and their allies launched an offensive against German forces with the hope of striking a blow on the stalemated Western Front and seeking control of the ridges south and east of the Belgian city of Ypres. 

The British turned to Canada, seeking their assistance, and 100,000 Canadian Corps troops joined the fight. These soldiers fought in porridge-like mud, and under a downpouring of almost constant rain. The Allied troops did ultimately prevail, claiming victory on November 6, 1917. Nine Victoria Crosses, one of the highest awards for military valour from the British, were awarded to Canadians following the battle. 

Although this was a victory for the Allies, it came at a high cost: over half a million men were killed, wounded or lost at Passchendaele. This battle was a major blow to the morale of the British forces, and a representation of the brutal fighting on the Western Front. The Battle of Passchendaele lasted from July 31 - November 6, 1917.

Targeting German Americans | The Great War

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Examine the effects of anti-German sentiment that swept through the United States soon after the country entered World War I, in this video adapted from The Great War: AMERICAN EXPERIENCE. Attacks on German Americans and their culture included the censorship of German songs and plays. Even more extreme was a presidential decree that established a registry of over 500,000 German Americans as “enemy aliens,” including some who could trace their American ancestors to back before the Revolutionary War. This resource is a part of the The Great War: AMERICAN EXPERIENCE | Collection.

President Theodore Roosevelt: Foreign Policy Statesman or Bully? | The Roosevelts

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Evaluate Theodore Roosevelt's legacy in foreign affairs with this lesson plan associated with Ken Burns' The Roosevelts. Students will analyze the U.S. Constitution as it pertains to the powers of the president to formulate and implement foreign policy, and debate Theodore Roosevelt's legacy using primary and secondary sources, including the video clips from The Roosevelts in this Media Gallery.

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