World War I

Airborne with the Ace of Spades

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From its humble beginnings as an Observation Squadron to its current role as an air refueling wing stationed at Fairchild Air Force base near Spokane, WA, the story of the Washington Air National Guard is a compelling one.

Since 1931, they have marked their birds with the Ace of Spades.

In this documentary from KSPS, Airborne Ace of Spades, the history of the Washington Air National Guard and its notable achievements are explored.

The Windsors | In Their Own Words: Queen Elizabeth II

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Learn about the reign of King George V and Queen Mary in this excerpt from In Their Own Words: Queen Elizabeth II. In 1917, with his realm at war with Germany, Queen Elizabeth’s grandfather, King George V, changes the family name from the German “Saxe-Coburg Gotha” to the British “Windsor.” King George V and Queen Mary have six children, including David, the heir to the throne, and his younger brother Albert.

Emma Goldman and Opposition to the First World War

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In May 1917, Emma Goldman and Alexander Berkman organized demonstrations protesting America’s recent entry into World War I — risking fines and imprisonment as President Woodrow Wilson's administration increasingly cracked down on anti-war resistance. Video from American Experience: “Emma Goldman”

Bill O'Reilly's Ancestry and the Meuse-Argonne Offensive: Clip | Finding Your Roots

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In this lesson, students learn about World War I through the ancestry of  Bill O’Reilly. O'Reilly is a descendant of Irish immigrants, and his grandfather — John O’Reilly III — served in WWI  in the 307th Infantry. The 307th was part of the “Melting Pot” division, largely composed of the children of New York City’s immigrants, including the Irish. During John’s service, he fought in one of the war’s most pivotal battles: the Meuse-Argonne Offensive of 1918.

How WWI Changed the World Forever

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This week marks the 100-year anniversary of World War I, which drastically altered the global map and changed the course of history. Help students explore and analyze the war with this PBS NewsHour video and educational materials from August 7, 2014.

West Virginians in War l 1753-1991

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Individuals and groups from western and West Virginia have been active in the military from the early settlement of the area through present day. Each of the 11 video excerpts in this gallery examines the role played by those individuals and groups in specific military actions. Click the link on the image or use the up/down arrows on the right to access each episode.

USS New Mexico BB40: The Drinan Diary

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Flagship of the American fleet, for over 30 years the USS New Mexico was the pride of the US Navy. Learn about the history of the "Queen" from her on board activities to dramatic accounts of the fierce fighting in the Pacific theater. Included are eye witness accounts from the Robert T. Drinan diary that vividly details how the ship suffered from kamikaze attacks during the battle of Okinawa. The video is narrated by Dean Stockwell with diary entries read by John Wertheim.

Mia Farrow’s Ancestry and The Battle of Gallipoli in WWI: Clip | Finding Your Roots

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In this lesson, students learn about the Battle of Gallipoli in WWI, and create and label a map to better understand the geography. Mia Farrow’s grandfather’s regiment was involved in the Gallipoli Campaign, in which Allied British, Australian, French, and New Zealand troops charged Turkish lines, resulting in some of the bloodiest fighting of the war.

Minnesota Legacy Short | Street Car Strike of 1917

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On the eve of World War I, conflict in St. Paul and Minneapolis between streetcar workers and the Twin Cities Rapid Transit Company set the stage for the fight to achieve the right of working people to organize in Minnesota, and created national awareness of the plight of working men and women.

Camp Zachary Taylor

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With the entry of the United States into World War I in 1917, the Army opened Camp Zachary Taylor on the outskirts of Louisville, Kentucky. It was the largest Army training camp in the country at that time. Designed for 44,000 men, the camp at its peak housed 59,900. In this video, historians discuss the camp’s history, including the Army’s first physical training program, the African-American 814th Pioneer Infantry, the naturalization of foreign-born soldiers who enlisted, and the deadly influenza outbreak in fall 1918. After war’s end in 1918, Camp Zachary Taylor was closed in 1921.

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