World War I

World War I and American Neutrality | The Great War

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Explore Woodrow Wilson’s policy of neutrality in the years before the United States entered World War I, through primary sources and videos excerpted from The Great War: AMERICAN EXPERIENCE. Despite Wilson’s proposed policy of “impartiality and fairness and friendliness,” intended to protect the nation against involvement in the war, the economic realities of profitable business arrangements with the Allies and the news coming solely from Great Britain helped tilt the United States toward support of the Allies. This resource is a part of The Great War: AMERICAN EXPERIENCE Collection.

Rise of a Warrior | Black Jack Pershing: Love and War

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In 1899, Pershing was sent to the Philippines, a new American possession, where Moro tribes were resisting US troops. Pershing admired these Muslim warriors. He studied their culture, used their language, and met their chiefs. When some of the Moro leaders proved unwilling to disarm in exchange for trade and jobs, Pershing attacked. He prevailed, gaining combat experience and personal recognition.

Alice Paul and Women’s Suffrage | The Great War

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Meet suffragist leader Alice Paul and learn about her undaunted fight for the right of women to vote, in this video adapted from AMERICAN EXPERIENCE: The Great War. Not wanting to be cast as unpatriotic, many women’s suffrage groups suspended their protests after the United States entered World War I in 1917. Paul and a small group of supporters continued their efforts. Paul accused President Woodrow Wilson of “obstructing the cause of democracy at home, while Americans were fighting for it abroad.” The publicity surrounding Paul’s imprisonment caused Wilson’s administration to come under attack. Wilson eventually decided to support women’s suffrage. This resource is a part of The Great War: AMERICAN EXPERIENCE Collection.

Black Jack | Black Jack Pershing: Love and War

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Pershing came to the University of Nebraska in 1891 to study law and fix the military program, which doubled and won a national drill title before he left to lead the African American 10th Cavalry Buffalo Soldiers. Next, Pershing returned to teaching, but his rigor sparked cadet revolt at West Point, earning him a rude nickname softened to (Black Jack) a reference to his Buffalo Soldier command.

A Postwar Vision in Fourteen Points | The Great War

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Examine the national and global context that motivated President Woodrow Wilson to write the Fourteen Points, his vision for attaining peace after World War I, in this video adapted from AMERICAN EXPERIENCE: The Great War. By the fall of 1917, with millions of U.S. soldiers heading into battle, a competing world vision emerging from Russia, and protests mounting at home, Wilson needed to propose a way forward. His January 8, 1918, speech to Congress included the Fourteen Points, which reflected his vision for the postwar world. Thanks to strong publicity, Wilson’s Fourteen Points reached people on both sides of the war—the Allies and Central Powers—and provided hope for ending the war with a lasting peace. This resource is a part of the The Great War: AMERICAN EXPERIENCE Collection.

Remembered | Black Jack Pershing: Love and War

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The Doughboys are credited with winning the Great War. They were welcomed home as true heroes. Pershing was promoted to the rank of six star general. He is considered one of the architects of the modern army, with its ability to cross oceans and represent a truly global power. Pershing never forgot the soldiers who fought and died under him. He helped create and dedicate monuments in their honor.

Who Started World War I | Crash Course World History

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Join host John Green to learn about the reasons World War I started and why the situation is so complicated. We'll try to get to the bottom of the confusion. However, it's very hard to assign blame to any one of the nations involved. Did the fault lie with Austria-Hungary? Germany? Russia? Julius Caesar? Join us for an interesting discussion in this episode of Crash Course!

A Rude Awakening | Black Jack Pershing: Love and War

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Before age four, Johnny Pershing saw his father risk his life against Confederate raiders. The boy grew up amid “life’s realities.” The family store went broke. Pershing’s father was forced to travel for work leaving a teenaged John behind who toiled three years on his family’s failing farm. Pershing decided success would depend on his own efforts. He taught school, until he heard of a life-changing chance to enter the U.S. Military Academy at West Point.

 

Crackdown on Dissent | The Great War

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Explore how President Wilson’s crackdown on dissent during World War I, which was strengthened by the Sedition Act in 1918, put civil liberties at risk, in this video adapted from The Great War: AMERICAN EXPERIENCE. Anyone who spoke out against the United States government, the flag, or the armed forces could be arrested and/or imprisoned. This led to a “chilling effect” on civil liberties at the same time that the United States was fighting in a war to “make the world safe for democracy.” This resource is a part of the The Great War: AMERICAN EXPERIENCE | Collection.

A New Kind of War | Black Jack Pershing: Love and War

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Restructuring was successful. The Americans still suffered high casualties but German losses were higher. Out of the trenches, the Doughboys advanced so swiftly orders could barely keep up with their victories. British and French in the north forced German retreat. Germany surrendered. Pershing wanted occupation to prevent future war. Though battles raged to the last, the Great War finally ended.

                 

 

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